Three Aspects Of Differentiation Of Self: Part Three

Sep 25, 2019

This is the third post in a three-part series about differentiation of self. Earlier, I discussed the first aspect of differentiation of self, which is the ability to look within yourself and identify what you think, believe, feel, and prefer; you can read that post here

In my last post, I wrote about the second aspect of differentiation of self, which is the ability to express what you think, feel, believe, and prefer, even if you think the person you’re expressing it to won’t agree. The third (and final) aspect of differentiation of self is the reverse of that equation. It’s the ability to hold steady when someone expresses their feelings and beliefs to you, even if you have some uncomfortable feelings or don’t like what you’re hearing.

Before I dive into how you can develop this aspect of differentiation, I’d like to discuss a bit about why it’s so important. Think back to the second aspect of differentiation. Have you ever told a little lie to avoid starting a fight? Have you ever hastily changed what you were about to say after seeing a certain look in your partner’s eye? Have you ever decided to postpone a conversation when you just know it’s not going to be received well, and then somehow forgotten to get back to it? 

Now put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Do you want to be in the position where your partner isn’t telling you everything, or is avoiding bringing up important topics, because they’re worried about how you will respond? 

Developing the third aspect of differentiation of self is about creating an atmosphere of safety in your relationship. It’s about being a person who encourages others to identify and express their truth. 

Consider the kinds of reactions and responses that are likely to discourage honest disclosure. If you happen to have a conflict-avoidant partner or loved one, pretty much any dramatic response will do it. For some people, even a small gesture, like an eye roll or crossed arms, can result in them deciding not to talk about a difficult topic.

Having an emotional response to something your partner is saying is probably not going to change your partner’s opinion or behavior. It’s more likely that they’ll continue to think whatever they think, and even possibly dig in a little deeper–and they might decide to stop telling you about it. 

If you want to get the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, you need to show your partner that you can handle hearing it. 

Of course, aspiring to hold steady when your partner tells you something it is hard for you to hear is easy enough. But in the moment, when you’re blindsided by a hurtful revelation, and your mind is leaping ahead to all sorts of horrible conclusions, it’s a different matter. Fortunately, just like the other two aspects of differentiation of self, this gets easier with practice. Here are some tips to get you started:

  • Get clear on why you want to get good at holding steady. This may be the most important part. How will your life, level of happiness, and relationships improve when you are in control of your reactions? Get specific. Make a list. “When I am great at managing my automatic reactions, my life will be better because…”
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  • Come up with a mantra, power word or image to remind you of why you want to do this. When your brain is in freak-out self-protective mode, and you would prefer not to go along for the ride, you will need some strong motivation to do something different, and it will need to be something you can grab onto with half your brain tied behind your back. What word or image would get your attention and remind you of your “why”? Cement it in your brain. Think of it often. Use it frequently, including in less extreme situations, over and over. Train your brain.
  • Recognize your reaction. Notice very early body signs that indicate you are starting to get activated. Do you feel nauseous? Tension in your neck or shoulders? Headache? Get familiar with your earliest possible warning signs, and take a small breather when you first experience them. Waiting will result in you needing a huge time out to hit “reset;” while that strategy is fine if you need it, it is not really the goal. The ultimate goal is to learn how to calm while the action unfolds so you can stay in the game. 
  • Calm your body. When you notice your emotions rising, and you are practicing managing your automatic reactions early, try breathing with a long exhale. Also try blinking slowly. Use your mantra or power word; call your image to mind. These are all strategies to tell your body and your brain that you are safe. Look around for evidence of safety. Put your feet on the floor. Breathe. Take a bathroom break and splash water on your face.
  • Take a connection break. Ask your partner for a little safety break; just hold hands and connect without talking, hug for two minutes, or maybe put on some music and do a little dance together. You could walk the dog together, or make a nice soup before you continue. Not exactly a time-out, but a break in which you work together to change the atmosphere to something relaxed and positive. Reassure yourself and one another that all is well; you’re just having some conversation and some feelings. You’ve got this. 
  • If you’re really having trouble, take a time-out. Sometimes despite trying all of the above, we just need a time out. Here are a few signs that indicate you could benefit from a substantial break:
    • You or your partner are getting mean
    • You or your partner are having trouble thinking
    • You feel confused and can’t figure out what’s going on
    • Your heart is racing, or your face is flushed
    • You are pointing your finger at your partner and saying “You….” at the start of your sentences, or your partner is doing that
    • You are thinking your signature negative thoughts that you have come to realize are probably actually catastrophizing
    • You feel like you might be digging yourself in a hole or making it worse

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